Please join your peers on either March 26 (8pm GMT) or March 28 (8am GMT) to watch as user extraordinaire and forum legend @"lindsay.stevens" demonstrates OpenClinica Insight.

See preview and register at https://openclinica.com/insight-webinar

Insight makes it easy to ask questions of ALL of your clinical and operational data and visualize answers via interactive reports and dashboards. The idea is simple, but the results are powerful: ask your questions, choose your visualizations, then return often for updated, interactive results that link you to all of the underlying data.

Community participation and governance

Hi OpenClinica Developers,
Cross posting here from a thread on the users list that sparked some thoughts on community participation and governance for OpenClinica.
You're probably here because you feel strongly, like I do, that there's a great collective benefit to using and advancing the usefulness of a common, open EDC/CDMS platform. We can innovate/differentiate at the edges - so much about EDC is changing quickly nowadays, but why should you first have to reinvent the same basic form design/form completion/data management/auditing capabilities that have been developed a hundred (or perhaps a thousand) times?
I'd like to get a discussion going about participation and governance of the OpenClinica project. We should be set up in a way that aligns people's motivation to adopt the technology while contributing back where appropriate. The right community model and the right culture have to be in place for this to happen in a scalable way. We take this commitment very seriously and have defined a core set of values for OpenClinica LLC team members to aspire to and to guide us - I recently shared them at http://blog.openclinica.com/2013/05/24/the-open-source-way/. But there's much more to do.
How are we doing, as a community, in encouraging users to participate in the community, sharing input and code, and have an experience that is a transparent and responsive?
Be honest and frank, let's get a conversation going! Do we have the right governance model in place? Is there enough transparency? Would you contribute/share more if certain barriers were lowered?
It would also be great to talk more about it in person with those of you who are attending OC13! Perhaps we can get a 'birds of a feather' group together to discuss over lunch.
Best,
Cal
--
------------------------------------------------------------------
Cal Collins
OpenClinica LLC
781.547.8411
[email protected]
OC13: OpenClinica 2013 Global Conference
June 21-22nd, Boston MA USA
https://community.openclinica.com/conference

Comments

  • tdpurnattdpurnat Posts: 126
    Dear Cal,
    I don't consider myself a software engineer, but some of the discussions on this list help my work with OC Community Ed, and I decided to reply here, not on the users list. I'm touching topics you mentioned on Users list as well.
    I'm sorry that you have licensing problems with Clinovo. I must say that my first reaction to learning about ClinCapture has been that any open source project will succeed only alongside a vibrant community of users and developers. It's more or less the point of the post about drupal you linked.
    So I think your approach to open discussion is welcome. And I agree with you that the culture we develop will enable the success of Open Clinica software. I would dare say that your team are the drivers of this culture, and how you drive the collaboration forward affects how people participate/not. I'm curious about what others will reply and how you will take the input forward!
    I prefer to give you some practical suggestions rather than a philosophical discussion on open source communities:
    My short comments regarding your questions:
    -Please tend to the community, to users of various knowledge levels, and to developers of various levels of expertise.
    -Communicate often about pretty much all aspects of the work. I know you are in control of what happens with the software but would appreciate knowing about things that affect my use of the system.
    -Find a balance between increased formalization of all communication vs informal exchange of ideas and opinions.
    -Governance of software engineering process is not at all a bad thing if you are consistent and transparent in its implementation within your own team and external contributors.
    Regarding support to users: In the past year, I have changed from being an Enterprise user to a Community user, and I have felt a noticeable void of access to information, response to bugs submitted to issue tracker, and reactions from your team. I have had to find support and troubleshooting ideas outside these email lists.
    What would personally work for me to get me more engaged?
    - you have already improved the documentation starting with 3.1; please continuously solicit ideas for areas of software that are insufficiently documented or need addition
    - find a way to show examples of design implementations, focusing on solutions to particular problems; a "user" is someone who needs to know how to set up a study and run it in OC, and one can learn best from examples
    - give access to a transparent issue tracking software, release schedules
    - you could try giving webinars for some new feature demos/Q&A sessions. I was excited to see the demo sessions you scheduled for the OC conference, but was disappointed that I would have to wait for 3 months to see some of the new ideas, and that I have to be present at the conference to see them. New issue tracker was one of them.
    - find a way to encourage community users to talk to each other and connect. Someone mentioned a while back that you are looking into an alternative to the current email lists setup. I would love to use your web site to see all registered users, where they are from, what they are doing, and have an ability to also connect in person with people who use OC closer to where I am located. That said, I would enjoy knowing your development team and the operations teams, too - at least the ones that are participating on the lists; some new names have come in lately.
    - i would love to give you user feedback on development releases, but do not have time to poke around with installing and deploying new releases. If you provided a development instance and informed me what is redesigned, fixed or new feature, I would be willing to volunteer some of my time testing it with you, as a dumb user.
    -I personally would also be interested in finding out whether you have any plan to incorporate enterprise functionality into community edition as the software develops and expands. I don't remember reading anywhere about what/when you are developing for Enterprise edition only, and how these offered features might change over time.
    I am sure that what is today an enterprise functionality will two years down the line be less of a selling point for enterprise users compared to some new feature you will come up with or build on top of existing one. But it might be a great basic functionality for community users.
    Regarding development, I write as a project manager, not an engineer: I would expect having an easy overview of what happens when code, new feature requests, bugs are contributed into your team - have you picked them up, what was result of your internal evaluation, is someone working on it, has it been put into next release and when is the next release coming out? How you handle other peoples work will make me consider contributing ideas from my team.
    - what is required for you to accept the contributed code into a release? So in general, the more you show that you strive for excellence in software development, the more quality participation from developers you will probably receive.
    - spend as much time cleaning up the code and fixing bugs as you are developing new features. Please tell us you are doing so.
    - you have improved QA of new releases, but please emphasize it in future as well
    - when you redevelop a functionality and you change the requirements, communicate those as well.
    - your information about a new release has improved. Keep it up!
    - have some sort of a mini consultation of your new requirements specifications. I'd like to have an opportunity to propose additions into your specs on a particular new functionality, when you have formalized it internally into a coherent specification but before you start development. Are you at all interested in this?
    - I'd love to get access to the new issue tracker. You mention you are already using it, what about the community? I first heard about it months ago, but I'm still waiting to start using it. In mean time, I personally have lost trust that issues I contribute to the current public one get seriously handled/followed up.
    - you have a general release schedule (a few times a year), but it would be great to actually have information on when the next release will be, and what bugs will be fixed and new features will be in it.
    Lastly, I suggest that Open Clinica works according to principle that (in most of above points) there should not be any differences between enterprise users and community users - in access to information and to at least some of your team.
    Would be happy to discuss more at OC13,
    Tina
    -----------------
    Tina D Dannemann Purnat, M.Sc., PMP, CCDM
    [email protected]
    Skype tdpurnat | Office Direct +49 89 2180 17625 | http://www.linkedin.com/in/tinadpurnat
    Department of Infectious Diseases & Tropical Medicine at the Ludwig-Maximilian-University Munich (LMU), Leopoldstrasse 7, 80799 München, Germany
    Main office +49 89 2180 17601 | Fax +49 89 33 60 38
    Why are my emails so terse? emailcharter.org [TED blog]
    2013/5/30 Cal Collins
    Hi OpenClinica Developers,
    Cross posting here from a thread on the users list that sparked some thoughts on community participation and governance for OpenClinica.
    You're probably here because you feel strongly, like I do, that there's a great collective benefit to using and advancing the usefulness of a common, open EDC/CDMS platform. We can innovate/differentiate at the edges - so much about EDC is changing quickly nowadays, but why should you first have to reinvent the same basic form design/form completion/data management/auditing capabilities that have been developed a hundred (or perhaps a thousand) times?
    I'd like to get a discussion going about participation and governance of the OpenClinica project. We should be set up in a way that aligns people's motivation to adopt the technology while contributing back where appropriate. The right community model and the right culture have to be in place for this to happen in a scalable way. We take this commitment very seriously and have defined a core set of values for OpenClinica LLC team members to aspire to and to guide us - I recently shared them at http://blog.openclinica.com/2013/05/24/the-open-source-way/. But there's much more to do.
    How are we doing, as a community, in encouraging users to participate in the community, sharing input and code, and have an experience that is a transparent and responsive?
    Be honest and frank, let's get a conversation going! Do we have the right governance model in place? Is there enough transparency? Would you contribute/share more if certain barriers were lowered?
    It would also be great to talk more about it in person with those of you who are attending OC13! Perhaps we can get a 'birds of a feather' group together to discuss over lunch.
    Best,
    Cal
    --
    ------------------------------------------------------------------
    Cal Collins
    OpenClinica LLC
    781.547.8411
    [email protected]
    OC13: OpenClinica 2013 Global Conference
    June 21-22nd, Boston MA USA
    https://community.openclinica.com/conference
  • ccollinsccollins Posts: 375 admin
    Tina,
    Thanks, this is great! One quick comment, I will follow up in more depth tomorrow and hope others will join in the conversation as well...
    The new issue tracker (JIRA) is online at http://50.57.189.131:8081/. It's read-only for now, since completing the transition from Mantis, and hooking it up to your openclinica.com sign-in, has taken longer than we thought it would. I understand the confusion this causes. But our development team is exclusively using Jira now so that's the the best way to follow the latest activities. Also, the high-level roadmap page is on our site at https://docs.openclinica.com/release-notes (and yes, it will have more detail soon).
    Rob, Alicia, me, and others on the team are working to make the tool and the processes we use as easily understandable as possible. If something doesn't make sense, please ask since others probably have the same questions.
    Best,
    Cal
    On Thu, May 30, 2013 at 11:57 AM, Tina D Purnat wrote:
    Dear Cal,
    I don't consider myself a software engineer, but some of the discussions on this list help my work with OC Community Ed, and I decided to reply here, not on the users list. I'm touching topics you mentioned on Users list as well.
    I'm sorry that you have licensing problems with Clinovo. I must say that my first reaction to learning about ClinCapture has been that any open source project will succeed only alongside a vibrant community of users and developers. It's more or less the point of the post about drupal you linked.
    So I think your approach to open discussion is welcome. And I agree with you that the culture we develop will enable the success of Open Clinica software. I would dare say that your team are the drivers of this culture, and how you drive the collaboration forward affects how people participate/not. I'm curious about what others will reply and how you will take the input forward!
    I prefer to give you some practical suggestions rather than a philosophical discussion on open source communities:
    My short comments regarding your questions:
    -Please tend to the community, to users of various knowledge levels, and to developers of various levels of expertise.
    -Communicate often about pretty much all aspects of the work. I know you are in control of what happens with the software but would appreciate knowing about things that affect my use of the system.
    -Find a balance between increased formalization of all communication vs informal exchange of ideas and opinions.
    -Governance of software engineering process is not at all a bad thing if you are consistent and transparent in its implementation within your own team and external contributors.
    Regarding support to users: In the past year, I have changed from being an Enterprise user to a Community user, and I have felt a noticeable void of access to information, response to bugs submitted to issue tracker, and reactions from your team. I have had to find support and troubleshooting ideas outside these email lists.
    What would personally work for me to get me more engaged?
    - you have already improved the documentation starting with 3.1; please continuously solicit ideas for areas of software that are insufficiently documented or need addition
    - find a way to show examples of design implementations, focusing on solutions to particular problems; a "user" is someone who needs to know how to set up a study and run it in OC, and one can learn best from examples
    - give access to a transparent issue tracking software, release schedules
    - you could try giving webinars for some new feature demos/Q&A sessions. I was excited to see the demo sessions you scheduled for the OC conference, but was disappointed that I would have to wait for 3 months to see some of the new ideas, and that I have to be present at the conference to see them. New issue tracker was one of them.
    - find a way to encourage community users to talk to each other and connect. Someone mentioned a while back that you are looking into an alternative to the current email lists setup. I would love to use your web site to see all registered users, where they are from, what they are doing, and have an ability to also connect in person with people who use OC closer to where I am located. That said, I would enjoy knowing your development team and the operations teams, too - at least the ones that are participating on the lists; some new names have come in lately.
    - i would love to give you user feedback on development releases, but do not have time to poke around with installing and deploying new releases. If you provided a development instance and informed me what is redesigned, fixed or new feature, I would be willing to volunteer some of my time testing it with you, as a dumb user.
    -I personally would also be interested in finding out whether you have any plan to incorporate enterprise functionality into community edition as the software develops and expands. I don't remember reading anywhere about what/when you are developing for Enterprise edition only, and how these offered features might change over time.
    I am sure that what is today an enterprise functionality will two years down the line be less of a selling point for enterprise users compared to some new feature you will come up with or build on top of existing one. But it might be a great basic functionality for community users.
    Regarding development, I write as a project manager, not an engineer: I would expect having an easy overview of what happens when code, new feature requests, bugs are contributed into your team - have you picked them up, what was result of your internal evaluation, is someone working on it, has it been put into next release and when is the next release coming out? How you handle other peoples work will make me consider contributing ideas from my team.
    - what is required for you to accept the contributed code into a release? So in general, the more you show that you strive for excellence in software development, the more quality participation from developers you will probably receive.
    - spend as much time cleaning up the code and fixing bugs as you are developing new features. Please tell us you are doing so.
    - you have improved QA of new releases, but please emphasize it in future as well
    - when you redevelop a functionality and you change the requirements, communicate those as well.
    - your information about a new release has improved. Keep it up!
    - have some sort of a mini consultation of your new requirements specifications. I'd like to have an opportunity to propose additions into your specs on a particular new functionality, when you have formalized it internally into a coherent specification but before you start development. Are you at all interested in this?
    - I'd love to get access to the new issue tracker. You mention you are already using it, what about the community? I first heard about it months ago, but I'm still waiting to start using it. In mean time, I personally have lost trust that issues I contribute to the current public one get seriously handled/followed up.
    - you have a general release schedule (a few times a year), but it would be great to actually have information on when the next release will be, and what bugs will be fixed and new features will be in it.
    Lastly, I suggest that Open Clinica works according to principle that (in most of above points) there should not be any differences between enterprise users and community users - in access to information and to at least some of your team.
    Would be happy to discuss more at OC13,
    Tina
    -----------------
    Tina D Dannemann Purnat, M.Sc., PMP, CCDM
    [email protected]
    Skype tdpurnat | Office Direct +49 89 2180 17625 | http://www.linkedin.com/in/tinadpurnat
    Department of Infectious Diseases & Tropical Medicine at the Ludwig-Maximilian-University Munich (LMU), Leopoldstrasse 7, 80799 München, Germany
    Main office +49 89 2180 17601 | Fax +49 89 33 60 38
    Why are my emails so terse? emailcharter.org [TED blog]
    2013/5/30 Cal Collins
    Hi OpenClinica Developers,
    Cross posting here from a thread on the users list that sparked some thoughts on community participation and governance for OpenClinica.
    You're probably here because you feel strongly, like I do, that there's a great collective benefit to using and advancing the usefulness of a common, open EDC/CDMS platform. We can innovate/differentiate at the edges - so much about EDC is changing quickly nowadays, but why should you first have to reinvent the same basic form design/form completion/data management/auditing capabilities that have been developed a hundred (or perhaps a thousand) times?
    I'd like to get a discussion going about participation and governance of the OpenClinica project. We should be set up in a way that aligns people's motivation to adopt the technology while contributing back where appropriate. The right community model and the right culture have to be in place for this to happen in a scalable way. We take this commitment very seriously and have defined a core set of values for OpenClinica LLC team members to aspire to and to guide us - I recently shared them at http://blog.openclinica.com/2013/05/24/the-open-source-way/. But there's much more to do.
    How are we doing, as a community, in encouraging users to participate in the community, sharing input and code, and have an experience that is a transparent and responsive?
    Be honest and frank, let's get a conversation going! Do we have the right governance model in place? Is there enough transparency? Would you contribute/share more if certain barriers were lowered?
    It would also be great to talk more about it in person with those of you who are attending OC13! Perhaps we can get a 'birds of a feather' group together to discuss over lunch.
    Best,
    Cal
    --
    ------------------------------------------------------------------
    Cal Collins
    OpenClinica LLC
    781.547.8411
    [email protected]
    OC13: OpenClinica 2013 Global Conference
    June 21-22nd, Boston MA USA
    https://community.openclinica.com/conference
  • kiranknkkiranknk Posts: 1
    hello
    unsubscribe pls!!!!
    On 31 May 2013 08:20, Cal Collins wrote:
    Tina,
    Thanks, this is great! One quick comment, I will follow up in more depth tomorrow and hope others will join in the conversation as well...
    The new issue tracker (JIRA) is online at http://50.57.189.131:8081/. It's read-only for now, since completing the transition from Mantis, and hooking it up to your openclinica.com sign-in, has taken longer than we thought it would. I understand the confusion this causes. But our development team is exclusively using Jira now so that's the the best way to follow the latest activities. Also, the high-level roadmap page is on our site at https://docs.openclinica.com/release-notes (and yes, it will have more detail soon).
    Rob, Alicia, me, and others on the team are working to make the tool and the processes we use as easily understandable as possible. If something doesn't make sense, please ask since others probably have the same questions.
    Best,
    Cal
    On Thu, May 30, 2013 at 11:57 AM, Tina D Purnat wrote:
    Dear Cal,
    I don't consider myself a software engineer, but some of the discussions on this list help my work with OC Community Ed, and I decided to reply here, not on the users list. I'm touching topics you mentioned on Users list as well.
    I'm sorry that you have licensing problems with Clinovo. I must say that my first reaction to learning about ClinCapture has been that any open source project will succeed only alongside a vibrant community of users and developers. It's more or less the point of the post about drupal you linked.
    So I think your approach to open discussion is welcome. And I agree with you that the culture we develop will enable the success of Open Clinica software. I would dare say that your team are the drivers of this culture, and how you drive the collaboration forward affects how people participate/not. I'm curious about what others will reply and how you will take the input forward!
    I prefer to give you some practical suggestions rather than a philosophical discussion on open source communities:
    My short comments regarding your questions:
    -Please tend to the community, to users of various knowledge levels, and to developers of various levels of expertise.
    -Communicate often about pretty much all aspects of the work. I know you are in control of what happens with the software but would appreciate knowing about things that affect my use of the system.
    -Find a balance between increased formalization of all communication vs informal exchange of ideas and opinions.
    -Governance of software engineering process is not at all a bad thing if you are consistent and transparent in its implementation within your own team and external contributors.
    Regarding support to users: In the past year, I have changed from being an Enterprise user to a Community user, and I have felt a noticeable void of access to information, response to bugs submitted to issue tracker, and reactions from your team. I have had to find support and troubleshooting ideas outside these email lists.
    What would personally work for me to get me more engaged?
    - you have already improved the documentation starting with 3.1; please continuously solicit ideas for areas of software that are insufficiently documented or need addition
    - find a way to show examples of design implementations, focusing on solutions to particular problems; a "user" is someone who needs to know how to set up a study and run it in OC, and one can learn best from examples
    - give access to a transparent issue tracking software, release schedules
    - you could try giving webinars for some new feature demos/Q&A sessions. I was excited to see the demo sessions you scheduled for the OC conference, but was disappointed that I would have to wait for 3 months to see some of the new ideas, and that I have to be present at the conference to see them. New issue tracker was one of them.
    - find a way to encourage community users to talk to each other and connect. Someone mentioned a while back that you are looking into an alternative to the current email lists setup. I would love to use your web site to see all registered users, where they are from, what they are doing, and have an ability to also connect in person with people who use OC closer to where I am located. That said, I would enjoy knowing your development team and the operations teams, too - at least the ones that are participating on the lists; some new names have come in lately.
    - i would love to give you user feedback on development releases, but do not have time to poke around with installing and deploying new releases. If you provided a development instance and informed me what is redesigned, fixed or new feature, I would be willing to volunteer some of my time testing it with you, as a dumb user.
    -I personally would also be interested in finding out whether you have any plan to incorporate enterprise functionality into community edition as the software develops and expands. I don't remember reading anywhere about what/when you are developing for Enterprise edition only, and how these offered features might change over time.
    I am sure that what is today an enterprise functionality will two years down the line be less of a selling point for enterprise users compared to some new feature you will come up with or build on top of existing one. But it might be a great basic functionality for community users.
    Regarding development, I write as a project manager, not an engineer: I would expect having an easy overview of what happens when code, new feature requests, bugs are contributed into your team - have you picked them up, what was result of your internal evaluation, is someone working on it, has it been put into next release and when is the next release coming out? How you handle other peoples work will make me consider contributing ideas from my team.
    - what is required for you to accept the contributed code into a release? So in general, the more you show that you strive for excellence in software development, the more quality participation from developers you will probably receive.
    - spend as much time cleaning up the code and fixing bugs as you are developing new features. Please tell us you are doing so.
    - you have improved QA of new releases, but please emphasize it in future as well
    - when you redevelop a functionality and you change the requirements, communicate those as well.
    - your information about a new release has improved. Keep it up!
    - have some sort of a mini consultation of your new requirements specifications. I'd like to have an opportunity to propose additions into your specs on a particular new functionality, when you have formalized it internally into a coherent specification but before you start development. Are you at all interested in this?
    - I'd love to get access to the new issue tracker. You mention you are already using it, what about the community? I first heard about it months ago, but I'm still waiting to start using it. In mean time, I personally have lost trust that issues I contribute to the current public one get seriously handled/followed up.
    - you have a general release schedule (a few times a year), but it would be great to actually have information on when the next release will be, and what bugs will be fixed and new features will be in it.
    Lastly, I suggest that Open Clinica works according to principle that (in most of above points) there should not be any differences between enterprise users and community users - in access to information and to at least some of your team.
    Would be happy to discuss more at OC13,
    Tina
    -----------------
    Tina D Dannemann Purnat, M.Sc., PMP, CCDM
    [email protected]
    Skype tdpurnat | Office Direct +49 89 2180 17625 | http://www.linkedin.com/in/tinadpurnat
    Department of Infectious Diseases & Tropical Medicine at the Ludwig-Maximilian-University Munich (LMU), Leopoldstrasse 7, 80799 München, Germany
    Main office +49 89 2180 17601 | Fax +49 89 33 60 38
    Why are my emails so terse? emailcharter.org [TED blog]
    2013/5/30 Cal Collins
    Hi OpenClinica Developers,
    Cross posting here from a thread on the users list that sparked some thoughts on community participation and governance for OpenClinica.
    You're probably here because you feel strongly, like I do, that there's a great collective benefit to using and advancing the usefulness of a common, open EDC/CDMS platform. We can innovate/differentiate at the edges - so much about EDC is changing quickly nowadays, but why should you first have to reinvent the same basic form design/form completion/data management/auditing capabilities that have been developed a hundred (or perhaps a thousand) times?
    I'd like to get a discussion going about participation and governance of the OpenClinica project. We should be set up in a way that aligns people's motivation to adopt the technology while contributing back where appropriate. The right community model and the right culture have to be in place for this to happen in a scalable way. We take this commitment very seriously and have defined a core set of values for OpenClinica LLC team members to aspire to and to guide us - I recently shared them at http://blog.openclinica.com/2013/05/24/the-open-source-way/. But there's much more to do.
    How are we doing, as a community, in encouraging users to participate in the community, sharing input and code, and have an experience that is a transparent and responsive?
    Be honest and frank, let's get a conversation going! Do we have the right governance model in place? Is there enough transparency? Would you contribute/share more if certain barriers were lowered?
    It would also be great to talk more about it in person with those of you who are attending OC13! Perhaps we can get a 'birds of a feather' group together to discuss over lunch.
    Best,
    Cal
    --
    ------------------------------------------------------------------
    Cal Collins
    OpenClinica LLC
    781.547.8411
    [email protected]
    OC13: OpenClinica 2013 Global Conference
    June 21-22nd, Boston MA USA
    https://community.openclinica.com/conference
  • tdpurnattdpurnat Posts: 126
    Dear Cal,
    I can't seem to open the link to the issue tracker, I tried form the office and from home. But either way, I hope you get it shared with the community soon.
    Tina
    ----------
    Skype: tdpurnat | Office: +49 89 38 03 89 67
    Why are my emails so terse? emailcharter.org
    2013/5/31 Cal Collins
    Tina,
    Thanks, this is great! One quick comment, I will follow up in more depth tomorrow and hope others will join in the conversation as well...
    The new issue tracker (JIRA) is online at http://50.57.189.131:8081/. It's read-only for now, since completing the transition from Mantis, and hooking it up to your openclinica.com sign-in, has taken longer than we thought it would. I understand the confusion this causes. But our development team is exclusively using Jira now so that's the the best way to follow the latest activities. Also, the high-level roadmap page is on our site at https://docs.openclinica.com/release-notes (and yes, it will have more detail soon).
    Rob, Alicia, me, and others on the team are working to make the tool and the processes we use as easily understandable as possible. If something doesn't make sense, please ask since others probably have the same questions.
    Best,
    Cal
    On Thu, May 30, 2013 at 11:57 AM, Tina D Purnat wrote:
    Dear Cal,
    I don't consider myself a software engineer, but some of the discussions on this list help my work with OC Community Ed, and I decided to reply here, not on the users list. I'm touching topics you mentioned on Users list as well.
    I'm sorry that you have licensing problems with Clinovo. I must say that my first reaction to learning about ClinCapture has been that any open source project will succeed only alongside a vibrant community of users and developers. It's more or less the point of the post about drupal you linked.
    So I think your approach to open discussion is welcome. And I agree with you that the culture we develop will enable the success of Open Clinica software. I would dare say that your team are the drivers of this culture, and how you drive the collaboration forward affects how people participate/not. I'm curious about what others will reply and how you will take the input forward!
    I prefer to give you some practical suggestions rather than a philosophical discussion on open source communities:
    My short comments regarding your questions:
    -Please tend to the community, to users of various knowledge levels, and to developers of various levels of expertise.
    -Communicate often about pretty much all aspects of the work. I know you are in control of what happens with the software but would appreciate knowing about things that affect my use of the system.
    -Find a balance between increased formalization of all communication vs informal exchange of ideas and opinions.
    -Governance of software engineering process is not at all a bad thing if you are consistent and transparent in its implementation within your own team and external contributors.
    Regarding support to users: In the past year, I have changed from being an Enterprise user to a Community user, and I have felt a noticeable void of access to information, response to bugs submitted to issue tracker, and reactions from your team. I have had to find support and troubleshooting ideas outside these email lists.
    What would personally work for me to get me more engaged?
    - you have already improved the documentation starting with 3.1; please continuously solicit ideas for areas of software that are insufficiently documented or need addition
    - find a way to show examples of design implementations, focusing on solutions to particular problems; a "user" is someone who needs to know how to set up a study and run it in OC, and one can learn best from examples
    - give access to a transparent issue tracking software, release schedules
    - you could try giving webinars for some new feature demos/Q&A sessions. I was excited to see the demo sessions you scheduled for the OC conference, but was disappointed that I would have to wait for 3 months to see some of the new ideas, and that I have to be present at the conference to see them. New issue tracker was one of them.
    - find a way to encourage community users to talk to each other and connect. Someone mentioned a while back that you are looking into an alternative to the current email lists setup. I would love to use your web site to see all registered users, where they are from, what they are doing, and have an ability to also connect in person with people who use OC closer to where I am located. That said, I would enjoy knowing your development team and the operations teams, too - at least the ones that are participating on the lists; some new names have come in lately.
    - i would love to give you user feedback on development releases, but do not have time to poke around with installing and deploying new releases. If you provided a development instance and informed me what is redesigned, fixed or new feature, I would be willing to volunteer some of my time testing it with you, as a dumb user.
    -I personally would also be interested in finding out whether you have any plan to incorporate enterprise functionality into community edition as the software develops and expands. I don't remember reading anywhere about what/when you are developing for Enterprise edition only, and how these offered features might change over time.
    I am sure that what is today an enterprise functionality will two years down the line be less of a selling point for enterprise users compared to some new feature you will come up with or build on top of existing one. But it might be a great basic functionality for community users.
    Regarding development, I write as a project manager, not an engineer: I would expect having an easy overview of what happens when code, new feature requests, bugs are contributed into your team - have you picked them up, what was result of your internal evaluation, is someone working on it, has it been put into next release and when is the next release coming out? How you handle other peoples work will make me consider contributing ideas from my team.
    - what is required for you to accept the contributed code into a release? So in general, the more you show that you strive for excellence in software development, the more quality participation from developers you will probably receive.
    - spend as much time cleaning up the code and fixing bugs as you are developing new features. Please tell us you are doing so.
    - you have improved QA of new releases, but please emphasize it in future as well
    - when you redevelop a functionality and you change the requirements, communicate those as well.
    - your information about a new release has improved. Keep it up!
    - have some sort of a mini consultation of your new requirements specifications. I'd like to have an opportunity to propose additions into your specs on a particular new functionality, when you have formalized it internally into a coherent specification but before you start development. Are you at all interested in this?
    - I'd love to get access to the new issue tracker. You mention you are already using it, what about the community? I first heard about it months ago, but I'm still waiting to start using it. In mean time, I personally have lost trust that issues I contribute to the current public one get seriously handled/followed up.
    - you have a general release schedule (a few times a year), but it would be great to actually have information on when the next release will be, and what bugs will be fixed and new features will be in it.
    Lastly, I suggest that Open Clinica works according to principle that (in most of above points) there should not be any differences between enterprise users and community users - in access to information and to at least some of your team.
    Would be happy to discuss more at OC13,
    Tina
    -----------------
    Tina D Dannemann Purnat, M.Sc., PMP, CCDM
    [email protected]
    Skype tdpurnat | Office Direct +49 89 2180 17625 | http://www.linkedin.com/in/tinadpurnat
    Department of Infectious Diseases & Tropical Medicine at the Ludwig-Maximilian-University Munich (LMU), Leopoldstrasse 7, 80799 München, Germany
    Main office +49 89 2180 17601 | Fax +49 89 33 60 38
    Why are my emails so terse? emailcharter.org [TED blog]
    2013/5/30 Cal Collins
    Hi OpenClinica Developers,
    Cross posting here from a thread on the users list that sparked some thoughts on community participation and governance for OpenClinica.
    You're probably here because you feel strongly, like I do, that there's a great collective benefit to using and advancing the usefulness of a common, open EDC/CDMS platform. We can innovate/differentiate at the edges - so much about EDC is changing quickly nowadays, but why should you first have to reinvent the same basic form design/form completion/data management/auditing capabilities that have been developed a hundred (or perhaps a thousand) times?
    I'd like to get a discussion going about participation and governance of the OpenClinica project. We should be set up in a way that aligns people's motivation to adopt the technology while contributing back where appropriate. The right community model and the right culture have to be in place for this to happen in a scalable way. We take this commitment very seriously and have defined a core set of values for OpenClinica LLC team members to aspire to and to guide us - I recently shared them at http://blog.openclinica.com/2013/05/24/the-open-source-way/. But there's much more to do.
    How are we doing, as a community, in encouraging users to participate in the community, sharing input and code, and have an experience that is a transparent and responsive?
    Be honest and frank, let's get a conversation going! Do we have the right governance model in place? Is there enough transparency? Would you contribute/share more if certain barriers were lowered?
    It would also be great to talk more about it in person with those of you who are attending OC13! Perhaps we can get a 'birds of a feather' group together to discuss over lunch.
    Best,
    Cal
    --
    ------------------------------------------------------------------
    Cal Collins
    OpenClinica LLC
    781.547.8411
    [email protected]
    OC13: OpenClinica 2013 Global Conference
    June 21-22nd, Boston MA USA
    https://community.openclinica.com/conference
  • rcautillorcautillo Posts: 17
    Tina,
    Can you please try this link: http://50.57.189.131:8081/secure/RapidBoard.jspa?rapidView=1&useStoredSettings=true
    In the upper right hand corner of the screen you will see 3 options Plan, Work, and Report. These sections will allow you to toggle through some different views of our backlog and current work.
    Best,
    Rob Cautillo
    On Fri, May 31, 2013 at 11:52 AM, Tina D Purnat wrote:
    Dear Cal,
    I can't seem to open the link to the issue tracker, I tried form the office and from home. But either way, I hope you get it shared with the community soon.
    Tina
    ----------
    Skype: tdpurnat | Office: +49 89 38 03 89 67
    Why are my emails so terse? emailcharter.org
    2013/5/31 Cal Collins
    Tina,
    Thanks, this is great! One quick comment, I will follow up in more depth tomorrow and hope others will join in the conversation as well...
    The new issue tracker (JIRA) is online at http://50.57.189.131:8081/. It's read-only for now, since completing the transition from Mantis, and hooking it up to your openclinica.com sign-in, has taken longer than we thought it would. I understand the confusion this causes. But our development team is exclusively using Jira now so that's the the best way to follow the latest activities. Also, the high-level roadmap page is on our site at https://docs.openclinica.com/release-notes (and yes, it will have more detail soon).
    Rob, Alicia, me, and others on the team are working to make the tool and the processes we use as easily understandable as possible. If something doesn't make sense, please ask since others probably have the same questions.
    Best,
    Cal
    On Thu, May 30, 2013 at 11:57 AM, Tina D Purnat wrote:
    Dear Cal,
    I don't consider myself a software engineer, but some of the discussions on this list help my work with OC Community Ed, and I decided to reply here, not on the users list. I'm touching topics you mentioned on Users list as well.
    I'm sorry that you have licensing problems with Clinovo. I must say that my first reaction to learning about ClinCapture has been that any open source project will succeed only alongside a vibrant community of users and developers. It's more or less the point of the post about drupal you linked.
    So I think your approach to open discussion is welcome. And I agree with you that the culture we develop will enable the success of Open Clinica software. I would dare say that your team are the drivers of this culture, and how you drive the collaboration forward affects how people participate/not. I'm curious about what others will reply and how you will take the input forward!
    I prefer to give you some practical suggestions rather than a philosophical discussion on open source communities:
    My short comments regarding your questions:
    -Please tend to the community, to users of various knowledge levels, and to developers of various levels of expertise.
    -Communicate often about pretty much all aspects of the work. I know you are in control of what happens with the software but would appreciate knowing about things that affect my use of the system.
    -Find a balance between increased formalization of all communication vs informal exchange of ideas and opinions.
    -Governance of software engineering process is not at all a bad thing if you are consistent and transparent in its implementation within your own team and external contributors.
    Regarding support to users: In the past year, I have changed from being an Enterprise user to a Community user, and I have felt a noticeable void of access to information, response to bugs submitted to issue tracker, and reactions from your team. I have had to find support and troubleshooting ideas outside these email lists.
    What would personally work for me to get me more engaged?
    - you have already improved the documentation starting with 3.1; please continuously solicit ideas for areas of software that are insufficiently documented or need addition
    - find a way to show examples of design implementations, focusing on solutions to particular problems; a "user" is someone who needs to know how to set up a study and run it in OC, and one can learn best from examples
    - give access to a transparent issue tracking software, release schedules
    - you could try giving webinars for some new feature demos/Q&A sessions. I was excited to see the demo sessions you scheduled for the OC conference, but was disappointed that I would have to wait for 3 months to see some of the new ideas, and that I have to be present at the conference to see them. New issue tracker was one of them.
    - find a way to encourage community users to talk to each other and connect. Someone mentioned a while back that you are looking into an alternative to the current email lists setup. I would love to use your web site to see all registered users, where they are from, what they are doing, and have an ability to also connect in person with people who use OC closer to where I am located. That said, I would enjoy knowing your development team and the operations teams, too - at least the ones that are participating on the lists; some new names have come in lately.
    - i would love to give you user feedback on development releases, but do not have time to poke around with installing and deploying new releases. If you provided a development instance and informed me what is redesigned, fixed or new feature, I would be willing to volunteer some of my time testing it with you, as a dumb user.
    -I personally would also be interested in finding out whether you have any plan to incorporate enterprise functionality into community edition as the software develops and expands. I don't remember reading anywhere about what/when you are developing for Enterprise edition only, and how these offered features might change over time.
    I am sure that what is today an enterprise functionality will two years down the line be less of a selling point for enterprise users compared to some new feature you will come up with or build on top of existing one. But it might be a great basic functionality for community users.
    Regarding development, I write as a project manager, not an engineer: I would expect having an easy overview of what happens when code, new feature requests, bugs are contributed into your team - have you picked them up, what was result of your internal evaluation, is someone working on it, has it been put into next release and when is the next release coming out? How you handle other peoples work will make me consider contributing ideas from my team.
    - what is required for you to accept the contributed code into a release? So in general, the more you show that you strive for excellence in software development, the more quality participation from developers you will probably receive.
    - spend as much time cleaning up the code and fixing bugs as you are developing new features. Please tell us you are doing so.
    - you have improved QA of new releases, but please emphasize it in future as well
    - when you redevelop a functionality and you change the requirements, communicate those as well.
    - your information about a new release has improved. Keep it up!
    - have some sort of a mini consultation of your new requirements specifications. I'd like to have an opportunity to propose additions into your specs on a particular new functionality, when you have formalized it internally into a coherent specification but before you start development. Are you at all interested in this?
    - I'd love to get access to the new issue tracker. You mention you are already using it, what about the community? I first heard about it months ago, but I'm still waiting to start using it. In mean time, I personally have lost trust that issues I contribute to the current public one get seriously handled/followed up.
    - you have a general release schedule (a few times a year), but it would be great to actually have information on when the next release will be, and what bugs will be fixed and new features will be in it.
    Lastly, I suggest that Open Clinica works according to principle that (in most of above points) there should not be any differences between enterprise users and community users - in access to information and to at least some of your team.
    Would be happy to discuss more at OC13,
    Tina
    -----------------
    Tina D Dannemann Purnat, M.Sc., PMP, CCDM
    [email protected]
    Skype tdpurnat | Office Direct +49 89 2180 17625 | http://www.linkedin.com/in/tinadpurnat
    Department of Infectious Diseases & Tropical Medicine at the Ludwig-Maximilian-University Munich (LMU), Leopoldstrasse 7, 80799 München, Germany
    Main office +49 89 2180 17601 | Fax +49 89 33 60 38
    Why are my emails so terse? emailcharter.org [TED blog]
    2013/5/30 Cal Collins
    Hi OpenClinica Developers,
    Cross posting here from a thread on the users list that sparked some thoughts on community participation and governance for OpenClinica.
    You're probably here because you feel strongly, like I do, that there's a great collective benefit to using and advancing the usefulness of a common, open EDC/CDMS platform. We can innovate/differentiate at the edges - so much about EDC is changing quickly nowadays, but why should you first have to reinvent the same basic form design/form completion/data management/auditing capabilities that have been developed a hundred (or perhaps a thousand) times?
    I'd like to get a discussion going about participation and governance of the OpenClinica project. We should be set up in a way that aligns people's motivation to adopt the technology while contributing back where appropriate. The right community model and the right culture have to be in place for this to happen in a scalable way. We take this commitment very seriously and have defined a core set of values for OpenClinica LLC team members to aspire to and to guide us - I recently shared them at http://blog.openclinica.com/2013/05/24/the-open-source-way/. But there's much more to do.
    How are we doing, as a community, in encouraging users to participate in the community, sharing input and code, and have an experience that is a transparent and responsive?
    Be honest and frank, let's get a conversation going! Do we have the right governance model in place? Is there enough transparency? Would you contribute/share more if certain barriers were lowered?
    It would also be great to talk more about it in person with those of you who are attending OC13! Perhaps we can get a 'birds of a feather' group together to discuss over lunch.
    Best,
    Cal
    --
    ------------------------------------------------------------------
    Cal Collins
    OpenClinica LLC
    781.547.8411
    [email protected]
    OC13: OpenClinica 2013 Global Conference
    June 21-22nd, Boston MA USA
    https://community.openclinica.com/conference
  • ccollinsccollins Posts: 375 admin
    Hi All,
    Tina, you clearly spent a lot of time thinking about this topic, and your suggestions are all great, thank you! Rather than go point by point I will try to group my reactions into themes, mention what we are currently working on, and use that to solicit additional input from the group:
    Transparency & Communication
    You mentioned getting to know the community better - that’s a great place to start! There have been some conversations on this list about better forum archives, sharing user profiles, etc. Rob Rittberg is currently working on some of these ideas and will have some plans to share soon.
    Also, we have added nine new people to the OpenClinica LLC team in the past year, while others you have known for some time are now in new positions. I’ll ask them to make introductions. Just to make it challenging for you, we now since January have hired three new people named Rob J
    There are several channels we as the community use to communicate, from formal to informal. Right now the OpenClinica project has community.openclinica.com, docs.openclinica.com, the OpenClinica wikibook, JIRA, and the email lists as the main online communications channels (am I leaving anything out?). We can use these all more effectively, especially JIRA. The ideas for more frequent demos/webinars, sessions to review design mockups and do collaborative requirements definition are welcome and we will put these into practice soon.
    Support/Ease of Adoption/Ease of Contributing
    One of “the Robs” we have recently hired, Rob Meffan, has come aboard as our Lead DevOps Engineer. The notion of “DevOps”, if you’re not familiar with it, stresses communication, collaboration and integration between software developers and IT to enable rapid deployment and reduce barriers to testing, delivery, and adoption. We have a big list of infrastructure and process improvements for the next 18 months in this area.
    The end goal is to have as frictionless, transparent and automated a process as possible for going from code check-in to build to testing to production installs of the software. It will significantly reduce technical barriers to contributing, testing, releasing, and installing OpenClinica. Rob M and I look forward to working closely with the community as we map out this infrastructure and put new enhancements in place.

    Roadmap and Releases
    What’s coming next and when? The two most frequently asked questions J
    I’ll send a separate email detailing current development plans and Alicia and I will make some updates to the roadmap page shortly. I realize that an easy to access, high-level roadmap is a really important of enabling contributors beyond the people we sit with here in our office everyday, and we haven’t done a great job of it recently.
    Speaking frankly, a major reason we haven’t had a real clear roadmap is that over the past two years we haven’t been delivering regular, on-time releases that meet expectations. It’s been frustrating for all of us and there are a few reasons for it, but the most significant one was the build-up of long-term technical debt in the code. This debt, defined as too much complexity and opaqueness in key parts of the code, meant whenever we tried to add a new feature or fix a bug, it would introduce other problems that were not easily detected. It also meant we could not accurately estimate how long any of these things would take. We’ve thus spent much of the past two years fixing bugs using a “shotgun approach”, based on whatever was perceived as causing the most pain. This ended up being highly inefficient because we were constantly making small patches to diverse parts of the system that, as I mentioned, weren't on a good foundation to begin with.
    We’re at a point now where we have learned some lessons and brought most existing features up to an acceptable level of stability. This puts us in a position to adopt a more sound approach. There are three major things we’re doing:
    Theme-based prioritization with aggressive code re-factoring. As I mentioned above, the “shotgun approach” to bug fixes and incremental improvements is not a very good practice. We are organizing each release cycle around a small number of themes, and we’ll focus on producing the highest quality, most usable functionality with the best quality code in the selected thematic areas. The Print CRF functionality is an example of this. Over time we’ll re-factor the whole system and add major new modules using this approach. What you’ll see as a user is that in any given release, changes and improvements will be significant in one or two areas of the system, with little to no change in the remaining modules.
    Agile development with empirical measurement using the JIRA/Greenhopper tools. The agile approach allows us to measure our true output over time, continually prioritize, and better predict the size/complexity (and thus expected timeline) of what’s on the roadmap.
    Automated testing. OpenClinica has a lot of features and is extremely configurable, and testing all permutations of all functions manually is pretty arduous. We have now developed a pretty comprehensive automated test suite and are in the process of validating it. Initially this will be used for Enterprise builds and validation purposes but I am committed to quickly finding a way to make it part of the community infrastructure, since it can provide great value for all developers and integrators.
    These changes, combined with a revamped and expanded internal development team and a commitment to involve community contributors in a meaningful way have me very excited for the future of OpenClinica and our community. We’ll be able to produce higher quality software, faster, and in a more predictable and inclusive way.
    Governance, Enterprise versus Community
    Two separate issues in many ways but highly intertwined. As we’ve always promised, 100% of the core OpenClinica source code we produce will always remain free and under an open source software license.
    We currently offer paid plug-ins and technology offerings as part of the OpenClinica Enterprise Edition that complement this core, but it is our goal to ensure that the Community Edition always stands on its own as a fully-functioning, 100% open source EDC/CDMS platform. Our eventual goal is to provide a core distribution that makes use of a series of free and non-free modules from many developers, the increasingly ubiquitous ‘app store’ module. That may mean that the Enterprise/Community Edition distinctions eventually go away completely. The work we’re doing to support standards-based APIs, refactoring using a RESTful architecture, and increasing ease of access to being a developer are all oriented to getting us to that point.
    One of Tina’s questions was what we are currently doing for development of Enterprise-specific features vs. Community. As I mentioned above we’ve spent nearly all our time the past two years fixing bugs and making improvements to the core, which benefits Enterprise and Community users. Currently the only feature/code differences between Enterprise and Community are that Enterprise users have the Data Mart module installed and have access to our centrally hosted Rule Designer, and those have only seen incremental development since 2011. Along the way, we’ve done some custom development features under contract that are now making their way into the core as well (such as LDAP support, which will be in 3.1.4). There certainly will be new Enterprise only modules over time, and we’ll be clear to communicate what those will be, but we have plenty to do on the core and our developers spend most of our time on that.
    Do bugs and feature requests from Enterprise customers get more attention and time from OpenClinica LLC than those from community members? On the whole, yes, and I think that’s fair. We all need to make a living after all J But it’s also a meritocracy too – the more you participate, share, and contribute in a high-quality way, the more attention you’ll get from the core development team.
    Tina’s right however about information sharing - we strive to provide the same level of information and transparency about what the development team is doing, what’s in the roadmap, etc. regardless of who you are. If you’re a new community member you may need to look deeper to learn what you need, as opposed to buying Enterprise, paying for our training, or getting paid support from a consultant in the community. But we provide free documentation, the same level of issue tracker access, and try to help on the mailing lists where we can and many others do as well. That’s what makes this community great – that there are so many diverse ways to succeed and many free and non-free resources to help you.
    Lastly, on governance. It's true that right now OpenClinica LLC (primarily Alicia, our Product Owner, and myself) are the final arbiters of what goes into the code and into each release. Even though we strive to be 100% transparent about it, I don’t think this is the optimal structure for OpenClinica the project in the long run; there should be more community involvement.
    It’s typical that an open source community evolves governance norms as the project grows and these can take different forms. Most emphasize a meritocratic structure (i.e., those who contribute the most have the most say). Those involved must commit the time and have the motivation to do it well and it’s important that distributed authority does not unduly slow down decision making. The models can range from an independent non-profit foundation to delegation of commit rights in different parts of the source code tree.
    Let’s discuss governance in more depth. How involved can you be? What model would you like to see? It is good time to have this discussion since the topic goes hand in hand with the DevOps investments we’re making to lower barriers to involvement.
    Sorry for the long post. If you’re actually still reading this, you should at least take the time to respond with your thoughts J. What ideas do you have that can make our community more prolific, supportive, and rewarding?
    Best,
    Cal
    On Fri, May 31, 2013 at 5:26 PM, Rob Cautillo wrote:
    Tina,
    Can you please try this link: http://50.57.189.131:8081/secure/RapidBoard.jspa?rapidView=1&useStoredSettings=true
    In the upper right hand corner of the screen you will see 3 options Plan, Work, and Report. These sections will allow you to toggle through some different views of our backlog and current work.
    Best,
    Rob Cautillo
    On Fri, May 31, 2013 at 11:52 AM, Tina D Purnat wrote:
    Dear Cal,
    I can't seem to open the link to the issue tracker, I tried form the office and from home. But either way, I hope you get it shared with the community soon.
    Tina
    ----------
    Skype: tdpurnat | Office: +49 89 38 03 89 67
    Why are my emails so terse? emailcharter.org
    2013/5/31 Cal Collins
    Tina,
    Thanks, this is great! One quick comment, I will follow up in more depth tomorrow and hope others will join in the conversation as well...
    The new issue tracker (JIRA) is online at http://50.57.189.131:8081/. It's read-only for now, since completing the transition from Mantis, and hooking it up to your openclinica.com sign-in, has taken longer than we thought it would. I understand the confusion this causes. But our development team is exclusively using Jira now so that's the the best way to follow the latest activities. Also, the high-level roadmap page is on our site at https://docs.openclinica.com/release-notes (and yes, it will have more detail soon).
    Rob, Alicia, me, and others on the team are working to make the tool and the processes we use as easily understandable as possible. If something doesn't make sense, please ask since others probably have the same questions.
    Best,
    Cal
    On Thu, May 30, 2013 at 11:57 AM, Tina D Purnat wrote:
    Dear Cal,
    I don't consider myself a software engineer, but some of the discussions on this list help my work with OC Community Ed, and I decided to reply here, not on the users list. I'm touching topics you mentioned on Users list as well.
    I'm sorry that you have licensing problems with Clinovo. I must say that my first reaction to learning about ClinCapture has been that any open source project will succeed only alongside a vibrant community of users and developers. It's more or less the point of the post about drupal you linked.
    So I think your approach to open discussion is welcome. And I agree with you that the culture we develop will enable the success of Open Clinica software. I would dare say that your team are the drivers of this culture, and how you drive the collaboration forward affects how people participate/not. I'm curious about what others will reply and how you will take the input forward!
    I prefer to give you some practical suggestions rather than a philosophical discussion on open source communities:
    My short comments regarding your questions:
    -Please tend to the community, to users of various knowledge levels, and to developers of various levels of expertise.
    -Communicate often about pretty much all aspects of the work. I know you are in control of what happens with the software but would appreciate knowing about things that affect my use of the system.
    -Find a balance between increased formalization of all communication vs informal exchange of ideas and opinions.
    -Governance of software engineering process is not at all a bad thing if you are consistent and transparent in its implementation within your own team and external contributors.
    Regarding support to users: In the past year, I have changed from being an Enterprise user to a Community user, and I have felt a noticeable void of access to information, response to bugs submitted to issue tracker, and reactions from your team. I have had to find support and troubleshooting ideas outside these email lists.
    What would personally work for me to get me more engaged?
    - you have already improved the documentation starting with 3.1; please continuously solicit ideas for areas of software that are insufficiently documented or need addition
    - find a way to show examples of design implementations, focusing on solutions to particular problems; a "user" is someone who needs to know how to set up a study and run it in OC, and one can learn best from examples
    - give access to a transparent issue tracking software, release schedules
    - you could try giving webinars for some new feature demos/Q&A sessions. I was excited to see the demo sessions you scheduled for the OC conference, but was disappointed that I would have to wait for 3 months to see some of the new ideas, and that I have to be present at the conference to see them. New issue tracker was one of them.
    - find a way to encourage community users to talk to each other and connect. Someone mentioned a while back that you are looking into an alternative to the current email lists setup. I would love to use your web site to see all registered users, where they are from, what they are doing, and have an ability to also connect in person with people who use OC closer to where I am located. That said, I would enjoy knowing your development team and the operations teams, too - at least the ones that are participating on the lists; some new names have come in lately.
    - i would love to give you user feedback on development releases, but do not have time to poke around with installing and deploying new releases. If you provided a development instance and informed me what is redesigned, fixed or new feature, I would be willing to volunteer some of my time testing it with you, as a dumb user.
    -I personally would also be interested in finding out whether you have any plan to incorporate enterprise functionality into community edition as the software develops and expands. I don't remember reading anywhere about what/when you are developing for Enterprise edition only, and how these offered features might change over time.
    I am sure that what is today an enterprise functionality will two years down the line be less of a selling point for enterprise users compared to some new feature you will come up with or build on top of existing one. But it might be a great basic functionality for community users.
    Regarding development, I write as a project manager, not an engineer: I would expect having an easy overview of what happens when code, new feature requests, bugs are contributed into your team - have you picked them up, what was result of your internal evaluation, is someone working on it, has it been put into next release and when is the next release coming out? How you handle other peoples work will make me consider contributing ideas from my team.
    - what is required for you to accept the contributed code into a release? So in general, the more you show that you strive for excellence in software development, the more quality participation from developers you will probably receive.
    - spend as much time cleaning up the code and fixing bugs as you are developing new features. Please tell us you are doing so.
    - you have improved QA of new releases, but please emphasize it in future as well
    - when you redevelop a functionality and you change the requirements, communicate those as well.
    - your information about a new release has improved. Keep it up!
    - have some sort of a mini consultation of your new requirements specifications. I'd like to have an opportunity to propose additions into your specs on a particular new functionality, when you have formalized it internally into a coherent specification but before you start development. Are you at all interested in this?
    - I'd love to get access to the new issue tracker. You mention you are already using it, what about the community? I first heard about it months ago, but I'm still waiting to start using it. In mean time, I personally have lost trust that issues I contribute to the current public one get seriously handled/followed up.
    - you have a general release schedule (a few times a year), but it would be great to actually have information on when the next release will be, and what bugs will be fixed and new features will be in it.
    Lastly, I suggest that Open Clinica works according to principle that (in most of above points) there should not be any differences between enterprise users and community users - in access to information and to at least some of your team.
    Would be happy to discuss more at OC13,
    Tina
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    Tina D Dannemann Purnat, M.Sc., PMP, CCDM
    [email protected]
    Skype tdpurnat | Office Direct +49 89 2180 17625 | http://www.linkedin.com/in/tinadpurnat
    Department of Infectious Diseases & Tropical Medicine at the Ludwig-Maximilian-University Munich (LMU), Leopoldstrasse 7, 80799 München, Germany
    Main office +49 89 2180 17601 | Fax +49 89 33 60 38
    Why are my emails so terse? emailcharter.org [TED blog]
    2013/5/30 Cal Collins
    Hi OpenClinica Developers,
    Cross posting here from a thread on the users list that sparked some thoughts on community participation and governance for OpenClinica.
    You're probably here because you feel strongly, like I do, that there's a great collective benefit to using and advancing the usefulness of a common, open EDC/CDMS platform. We can innovate/differentiate at the edges - so much about EDC is changing quickly nowadays, but why should you first have to reinvent the same basic form design/form completion/data management/auditing capabilities that have been developed a hundred (or perhaps a thousand) times?
    I'd like to get a discussion going about participation and governance of the OpenClinica project. We should be set up in a way that aligns people's motivation to adopt the technology while contributing back where appropriate. The right community model and the right culture have to be in place for this to happen in a scalable way. We take this commitment very seriously and have defined a core set of values for OpenClinica LLC team members to aspire to and to guide us - I recently shared them at http://blog.openclinica.com/2013/05/24/the-open-source-way/. But there's much more to do.
    How are we doing, as a community, in encouraging users to participate in the community, sharing input and code, and have an experience that is a transparent and responsive?
    Be honest and frank, let's get a conversation going! Do we have the right governance model in place? Is there enough transparency? Would you contribute/share more if certain barriers were lowered?
    It would also be great to talk more about it in person with those of you who are attending OC13! Perhaps we can get a 'birds of a feather' group together to discuss over lunch.
    Best,
    Cal
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    Cal Collins
    OpenClinica LLC
    781.547.8411
    [email protected]
    OC13: OpenClinica 2013 Global Conference
    June 21-22nd, Boston MA USA
    https://community.openclinica.com/conference
This discussion has been closed.