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WIdth_Decimal Setting

Hello,
Can somebody please help me with the width_decimal property in the CRF definition.
I have a field for weight and I expect it to be entered in the form 999.9.
In the width decimal property should I specify 5(1), 4(1) or 3(1) ?
I think that 4(1) is the right one but am not sure.
Please assist me on this.
Kind regards,
Clemens

Comments

  • mloebemloebe Posts: 22
    Hello,
    2011/1/20 Clemens Masesa :
    > > Hello,
    > >
    > > Can somebody please help me with the width_decimal property in the CRF
    > > definition.
    > >
    > > I have a field for weight and I expect it to be entered in the form 999.9.
    > >
    > > In the width decimal property should I specify 5(1), 4(1) or 3(1) ?
    > >
    > > I think that 4(1) is the right one but am not sure.
    You are right indeed.
    Kind regards,
    Matthias
    -- Matthias Löbe, Inst. for Medical Informatics (IMISE), University of Leipzig Härtelstr. 16, D-04107 Leipzig, +49 341 97 16113, [email protected]
  • cpmasesacpmasesa Posts: 106
    Thanks Mathias,
    A colleague just said to me that 5(1) is the correct option as in "999.9" there are a total of 5 characters (including the ".") and 1 decimal place.
    So I suppose I would be right in saying that the "principal" for width_decimal is then x(y) where x = total number of digits and y is the digits to the right of the decimal point.
    Kind regards,
    Clemens
    On 20/01/2011 17:30, Matthias Löbe wrote:
    > Hello,
    >
    > 2011/1/20 Clemens Masesa:
    >> Hello,
    >>
    >> Can somebody please help me with the width_decimal property in the CRF
    >> definition.
    >>
    >> I have a field for weight and I expect it to be entered in the form 999.9.
    >>
    >> In the width decimal property should I specify 5(1), 4(1) or 3(1) ?
    >>
    >> I think that 4(1) is the right one but am not sure.
    > You are right indeed.
    >
    > Kind regards,
    > Matthias
    >
  • cpmasesacpmasesa Posts: 106
    Thanks Mathias,
    A colleague just said to me that 5(1) is the correct option as in "999.9" there are a total of 5 characters (including the ".") and 1 decimal place.
    So I suppose I would be right in saying that the "principal" for width_decimal is then x(y) where x = total number of digits and y is the digits to the right of the decimal point.
    Kind regards,
    Clemens
    On 20/01/2011 17:30, Matthias Löbe wrote:
    > Hello,
    >
    > 2011/1/20 Clemens Masesa:
    >> Hello,
    >>
    >> Can somebody please help me with the width_decimal property in the CRF
    >> definition.
    >>
    >> I have a field for weight and I expect it to be entered in the form 999.9.
    >>
    >> In the width decimal property should I specify 5(1), 4(1) or 3(1) ?
    >>
    >> I think that 4(1) is the right one but am not sure.
    > You are right indeed.
    >
    > Kind regards,
    > Matthias
    >
  • mochisoftmochisoft Posts: 46
    Hello,
    use 5(1). I think the (.) is considered as a character and therefore to represent 999.9, you will have to use 5(1).
    Kind Regards,
    Michael.
    2011/1/20 Matthias Löbe
    Hello,
    2011/1/20 Clemens Masesa :
    > Hello,
    >
    > Can somebody please help me with the width_decimal property in the CRF
    > definition.
    >
    > I have a field for weight and I expect it to be entered in the form 999.9.
    >
    > In the width decimal property should I specify 5(1), 4(1) or 3(1) ?
    >
    > I think that 4(1) is the right one but am not sure.
    You are right indeed.
    Kind regards,
    Matthias
    --
    Matthias Löbe, Inst. for Medical Informatics (IMISE), University of Leipzig
    Härtelstr. 16, D-04107 Leipzig, +49 341 97 16113, [email protected]
  • cpmasesacpmasesa Posts: 106
    Hi
    With regards to width_decimal.
    The instructions tab says that one can specify width_decimal for ST, INT and REAL data types.
    I understand for REAL but not for ST or INT.
    My understanding is that:
    a) INT is an integer, no decimal places. Why are we allowed to specify a decimal then?
    b) ST is a string (text). What would be the relevance of "decimal" here?
    Kind regards,
    Clemens
    On 20/01/2011 17:30, Matthias Löbe wrote:
    > Hello,
    >
    > 2011/1/20 Clemens Masesa:
    >> Hello,
    >>
    >> Can somebody please help me with the width_decimal property in the CRF
    >> definition.
    >>
    >> I have a field for weight and I expect it to be entered in the form 999.9.
    >>
    >> In the width decimal property should I specify 5(1), 4(1) or 3(1) ?
    >>
    >> I think that 4(1) is the right one but am not sure.
    > You are right indeed.
    >
    > Kind regards,
    > Matthias
    >
  • cpmasesacpmasesa Posts: 106
    Hi
    With regards to width_decimal.
    The instructions tab says that one can specify width_decimal for ST, INT and REAL data types.
    I understand for REAL but not for ST or INT.
    My understanding is that:
    a) INT is an integer, no decimal places. Why are we allowed to specify a decimal then?
    b) ST is a string (text). What would be the relevance of "decimal" here?
    Kind regards,
    Clemens
    On 20/01/2011 17:30, Matthias Löbe wrote:
    > Hello,
    >
    > 2011/1/20 Clemens Masesa:
    >> Hello,
    >>
    >> Can somebody please help me with the width_decimal property in the CRF
    >> definition.
    >>
    >> I have a field for weight and I expect it to be entered in the form 999.9.
    >>
    >> In the width decimal property should I specify 5(1), 4(1) or 3(1) ?
    >>
    >> I think that 4(1) is the right one but am not sure.
    > You are right indeed.
    >
    > Kind regards,
    > Matthias
    >
  • JanusJanus Posts: 260
    I agree. 5(1) allows 5 characters. Of those 5 characters, 1 is a decimal,
    but this infers that one of the remaining 4 characters is a . (dot), hereby
    leaving 3 characters for the "principal". Hence 5(1) allows the following
    range: [0.0 - 999.9]
    Best regards,
    Janus

    Clemens Masesa
    To
    Sent by: [email protected]
    [email protected] cc
    nclinica.com [email protected]
    Subject
    Re: [Users] WIdth_Decimal Setting
    20-01-2011 16:02


    Please respond to
    Clemens Masesa
    ; Please
    respond to
    [email protected]
    .com


    Thanks Mathias,
    A colleague just said to me that 5(1) is the correct option as in
    "999.9" there are a total of 5 characters (including the ".") and 1
    decimal place.
    So I suppose I would be right in saying that the "principal" for
    width_decimal is then x(y) where x = total number of digits and y is the
    digits to the right of the decimal point.
    Kind regards,
    Clemens
    On 20/01/2011 17:30, Matthias Löbe wrote:
    > > Hello,
    > >
    > > 2011/1/20 Clemens Masesa:
    >> >> Hello,
    >> >>
    >> >> Can somebody please help me with the width_decimal property in the CRF
    >> >> definition.
    >> >>
    >> >> I have a field for weight and I expect it to be entered in the form
    999.9.
    >> >>
    >> >> In the width decimal property should I specify 5(1), 4(1) or 3(1) ?
    >> >>
    >> >> I think that 4(1) is the right one but am not sure.
    > > You are right indeed.
    > >
    > > Kind regards,
    > > Matthias
    > >
  • mloebemloebe Posts: 22
    Okay, you are right.
    I read about that in
    http://clinicalresearch.wordpress.com/2009/07/07/openclinica-3-0-features-part-ii/.
    It says "For example, the creator could specify that a field should
    have no more than 5 digits total with a maximum of 1 decimal place by
    entering 5(1) in the Width_Decimal column of the OpenClinica
    template."
    I didn't considered the dot a digit then.
    Since I've used this column once before, I've tested it now and WIDTH
    is including the dot, therefore it is the total number of characters
    and DECIMAL is the number of decimal places (round) so REAL 5(1) would
    accept 12345 and 1234. and 123.4 and even 12.30 with 2 decimal
    characters but not 12.34 or 012345 or 12.300.
    I think it is more directed at data processing then data validation.
    Matthias
This discussion has been closed.